Archive for the ‘Stony Plain Records’ Tag

Sue Foley- The Ice Queen review   Leave a comment

sue foley

Sue Foley The Ice Queen Stony Plain Records

When one considers contemporary blues guitarists, naturally several come to mind, and being a bit northern-centric, Sue Foley immediately jumps to the fore. That paisley-bejeweled pink Telecaster wouldn’t be nearly as impressive in lesser hands, and over the course of nearly three decades as a touring bandleader, the Ottawa-native has certainly established a niche all her own.

Finger-picking his Foley’s forte, and the title track is an ideal example of her inimitable style; clocking in at six-plus minutes, the playful and self-deprecating number provides the album with a rock-solid foundation. But, as she has with various international sounds over the years, Foley also extends herself acoustically late in the set when she plays “The Dance,” this time utilizing the flamenco style.

As significant as the guitar playing is throughout the album—from Foley, of course, but also her guests including Charlie Sexton, Billy Gibbons, Jimmie Vaughan, to name the three most familiar—what is even more impressive is the depth she goes to give voice to these songs.

She gets low and bluesy a la Lucinda singing the many and diverse qualities of cruel ol’ “81” (“She’s a two-headed snake, and she winds her tail, from the mighty Appalachians to the gates of Hell”) while roaring above a lively ruckus on “Run,” a free-spirited jam featuring thick bass-notes from Austin’s Johnny Bradley and drumming from George Rains from Vaughan’s Tilt a Whirl band. This trio propels a pair of additional numbers—with help from others—Bessie Smith’s “Send Me To the ‘Lectric Chair” and “If I Have Forsaken You.”

Throughout, Foley’s singing is engaged as she brilliantly slips from one style to the next, each authentic within her blues experience. Foley’s haunting acoustic country-blues treatment of her own “Death of A Dream” is quite simply stunning, while  a lively (and apparently near-elusive) “Cannonball Blues” serves as an ideal conclusion to a collection set in tradition.

Featuring a bevy of Texas heat, The Ice Queen allows several of Foley’s musical friends an opportunity to make significant appearances. Charlie Sexton’s initial contributions—on the opening “Come To Me” and its follow-up “81”—are impressive, and set the theme for the album with masters collaborating in expected ways to yield extraordinary results. I’ve never been a particular fan of Vaughan’s, but he and Foley slip into “The Lucky Ones” with companionable ease. Producer Mike Flanigin’s Hammond B3 punctuates several songs, most effectively on the ramblin’ “Gaslight,” while Billy Gibbons gets fair gritty with Foley on “Fool’s Gold,” another number on which Flanigin is prominently featured.

The Ice Queen is Sue Foley’s first album in six years, and a more welcome, forceful, and confident return couldn’t be imagined. I imagine it is everything fans have been waiting for, and more. Now, to finesse an early-April road trip to Red Deer…




Ronnie Earl & The Broadcasters- The Luckiest Man review   Leave a comment

Ronnie Earl

Ronnie Earl & The Broadcasters The Luckiest Man Stony Plain Records

Bobby Bland’s (written by Don Robey) “Ain’t That Loving You” kicks off this latest blues missive from Ronnie Earl & The Broadcasters, and the sultry take paves the way toward 70 minutes of the finest, freshest, and grooviest electric blues we experienced in 2017.

The spectre of the inevitable hovers over the album when one considers that the album is dedicated to the memory of The Broadcasters’ bass player Jim Mouradian. Vocalist Diane Blue provides a haunting interpretation of “Death Don’t Have No Mercy,” one of several notable performances contained on this most generous blues offering. David Limina shows off his B3 touch on “Heartbreak (It’s Hurtin’ Me)” and “Blues for Magic Slim” is a tasteful guitar-based tribute to the Mississippi-Chicago bluesman.

Heading into his 30th year leading The Broadcasters, Ronnie Earl brought back some of the group’s earliest members—now known as Sugar Ray and the Bluetones—to have a “Long Lost Conversation.” Clocking in at more than ten minutes, the ‘give and take’ of these old friends keeps the listener intrigued. Similarly and even more captivating, the even longer “So Many Roads” allows the current crop of Broadcasters to jam a bit on the number most often associated with John Mayall.

Another stellar release from Ronnie Earl & The Broadcasters.

Kevin Breit- Johnny Goldtooth and the Chevy Casanovas review   Leave a comment


Kevin Breit Johnny Goldtooth and the Chevy Casanovas Stony Plain Records

Without doubt, Kevin Breit is one of Canada’s most intriguing musicians.

Whether working in conjunction with pals including Harry Manx (three albums) and The Sisters Euclid (five albums), on his own (seven and more releases), or as a sideman, Breit always brings something engaging and frankly unique to his recorded appearances. Blues, jazz, roots, and folk, Breit has demonstrated he can turn his hands and ears to every type of music. Last time out with the old-world, mandolin extravaganza Ernesto and Delilah, Breit created a showcase of story-telling and creativity as engaging as it was challenging.

Not one to repeat himself, Breit now conjures himself as Johnny Goldtooth and the Chevy Casanovas to deliver a (largely) instrumental set of guitar-based tunes to evoke a smarmy, 60s lounge-vibe with Duane Eddy accompaniment. Blasting out the set in ten days, Breit called upon friends to provide select overdubs, but what we have here is essentially Breit concocting his own experiments in vintage sounds much like Neil Young once did (in a different vein) with the Shocking Pinks.

The result is mixed. While one digs (and really, no other word is as appropriate) what Breit has done with this recording, after four or five songs it tends to blend into one extended jam of righteous coolness. “C’mon, Let Go” combines the mood of after-school cartoons (think Lippy the Lion & Hardy Har-Har) with Velvet Underground “Sweet Jane” riffs. “The Knee High Fizzle” takes a jaunty run through rockabilly references, with “Chevy Casanova” illuminating more uptown touches, complete  with lively saxophone from Vincent Henry. Always a sucker for a bit of “Yakety Sax” (or yakety axe), “I Got ‘Em Too” is a favoured romp.

However, other pieces appear little more than excuse for playful song titles as evidenced by “Cozy With Rosy” and “Zing Zong Song, which initially borrows from Treme’s theme, before sliding into Los Straitjackets territory. “One Mo Bo,” a Bo Diddley homage, doesn’t progress beyond its implicit limitations, and “The Goldtooth Shuffle” isn’t much more than a groove, albeit a fine one, extended to three minutes. Predictably, “A Horse of Another Stripe” and “Dr. Lee Van Cleef” recall cinematic vistas.

None of which diminishes the obvious skill and artistry Breit possesses, nor the encompassing appeal of this recording. If nothing else, it is a whole lot of fun. Everybody’s Rockin’ clocked in at 25 or so minutes, a light, concise, and contemporaneously lambasted statement of rock ‘n’ roll minimalism that time has been kind toward. Breit gives Johnny Goldtooth and the Chevy Casanovas more rope, and while the results are not exclusively excellent, accepted for what it is—a blast of spirited, comedic, guitar wizardry—it provides an overwhelmingly pleasurable journey.

Posted 2017 November 14 by Donald Teplyske in Uncategorized

Tagged with , , ,

Eric Bibb, Tom Ewing, Rob Benzing reviews   Leave a comment

I was busy writing last weekend, and the products of my efforts have been published over at Lonesome Road Review.

Eric Bibb’s Migration Blues from Stony Plain Records: it is as good as you hope.

Bill Monroe’s last lead singer, Tom Ewing, has put together a compilation of tracks from his late 80-early 90 cassette tapes: Tom knows bluegrass.

Rob Benzing is a DC area banjo talent.

BIBB_MigrationBlues_livretTom Ewingrob benzing



Rory Block- Keepin’ Outta Trouble review   2 comments


Rory Block Keepin’ Outta Trouble: A Tribute to Bukka White Stony Plain Records

Indisputably, Rory Block is one of the most impressive contemporary blues artists. Rooted so deeply in country blues traditions, Block can’t be anything but authentic. Unfortunately, I’ve not caught every installment of her Mentor Series, which started with her tribute to Son House in 2008 and now stands at six volumes, but I’ve heard enough to know that she does nothing in half-measures.

As Block writes in her liner notes, “More than any artist in my Mentor Series, Bukka inspired me to write new songs.” With that, one shouldn’t be surprised that Block has done a true tribute here; not only has she crafted five Booker T. Washington “Bukka” White songs in her own individual, immitigable style, but she has created a further five originals capturing the time and mythologies of White’s life and career.

An exciting album from start to finish, Block—who plays everything on this disc, including percussive Quaker Oats boxes—and co-producer Rob Davis establish a sparse, natural sound.

Opening with a pair of originals setting the table as a frame of reference for both the uninitiated and the connoisseur, in short order Block nails standards including “Aberdeen Mississippi Blues,” “Fixin’ To Die Blues,” and “Parchman Farm Blues.” With attention to detail, but an even greater sense of purpose, Block enlivens these performances with a balance of passion and precision that breathes life into oft-encountered numbers.

Masterfully, she closes the set with the album’s most significant performances. Built upon “Bukka’s Jitterbug Swing,” Block’s “Gonna Be Some Walkin’ Done” captures not only the reality of White’s circumstance, but envelopes the traditions of finding something new in what has come before. “Back to Memphis” pulls everything together, encapsulating eighty years of blues history and development in five minutes.

As someone who doesn’t have much patience for raucous noisy blues, Rory Block’s interpretation of the music’s foundation is always welcome. Her voice is magic, and her approach to blues guitar is clean, restrained, and just damn fine beautiful. Keepin’ Outta Trouble: A Tribute to Bukka White is an excellent album.

Thank you for your interest in Fervor Coulee. Donald



MonkeyJunk- Time to Roll review   Leave a comment


MonkeyJunk Time to Roll Stony Plain Records

There is an American band starting to make a bit of noise south of the border with an aggressive, swampy blend of rhythm & blues that is as deeply entrenched in tradition as it is forward looking. They are called The Blue Shadows (Canadian readers pause—they have nothing to do with our Blue Shadows, natch) and if I didn’t know better I would suspect they’ve spent their time cribbing from MonkeyJunk.

MonkeyJunk, the preeminent Canadian power trio not named Rush, never have messed around. Give them a stack of amps and a stage, and the Ottawa-based group are happy to deliver their spirited blues-rock to whomever is willing to listen. Time to Roll is their fifth set of music, and to me it sounds their most accomplished to date.

Adding bass to the mix for the first time, MonkeyJunk’s approach hasn’t dramatically changed—lively party music with lyrics more impressive than frequently encountered within this segment of the blues. For generations raised on early J. Geils Band, Foghat, and the Allman Brothers, MonkeyJunk slips smoothly into a familiar groove.

Recorded over a concise series of sessions, the immediacy of the process may be part of the reason Time to Roll sounds so fresh and invigorating. “Blue Lights Go Down” aches with palatable passion; I’m not sure what it is about Tom Wilson, but one didn’t need to refer to the credits to immediately identify his signature touch on this co-written number.

With a throbbing introduction reminiscent of both Russ Ballard’s “On The Rebound” and “Can I Get a Witness,” the title track is a rallying exhortation for moving on from the constraints of the predictable. Three songs are co-written with fellow Canadian bluesman Paul Reddick, the most vibrant of which is “Pray for Rain,” an incantation of mesmerizing eyes and dramatic rhythms.

As strong as the first half of Time to Roll is, the band busts it to pieces within a blistering second act.

Fittingly paying tribute to Albert King by updating “The Hunter,” MonkeyJunk also offers a plaintive “Can’t Call You Baby” to add considerable intensity to this ten-track album. Delving a bit further south with the call and response rhythms of “Undertaken Blues” and the positively peppy “Gone,” a staggering Booker T-influenced instrumental “Fuzzy Poodle” closes the disc.

MonkeyJunk has become one of the most awarded bands in Canadian blues history. Time to Roll won’t change that: it is an electric collection of tradition-rich, rollicking modern blues.

Thank you for visiting Fervor Coulee. Donald

Ronnie Earl & the Broadcasters- Maxwell Street review   Leave a comment

Still catching up on summer…


Ronnie Earl & the Broadcasters

Maxwell Street

Stony Plain Records

Ronnie Earl has been around. Twenty-plus albums, the last ten on Canada’s venerable Stony Plain Records, has found the master guitarist one of the most revered guitarists producing the blues. At times a little jazzy, often late-night right, Earl and the Broadcasters has consistently released albums of high quality. With Maxwell Street, Earl pays tribute to a past member of the Broadcasters David Maxwell as well as Chicago’s Maxwell Street. As always, this is a largely instrumental collection of evocative music that draws in the listener with exquisite timing and interplay. Soulful vocalist Diane Blue appears—as she has in recent recordings—breaking things up with her sensitive offerings on a few numbers including the album closing “As The Years Go Passing By.” A near-12 minute reading of Otis Rush’s “Double Trouble” is a workout. Key cuts: those mentioned as well as “(I’ve Got to Use My) Imagination” and “Elegy for a Bluesman.”